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operations_management

Operations Management

Course length

This course is one-week long.

Marks overview

  • In-class - 2 case-studies 10% each - 20%
  • Learning Exercise 30%
  • Daily activities 10%
  • Final exam 40%

Textbook

Learning Exercise

Videos to watch

Recommended articles

Other resources

  • For statistics, tools, country indicators, Project Mgmt tutorials and courses, etc. see resources

In-class activities

  • There are 2 in-class assignments that need to be completed in-class on days 2 and day 3. These are due on day 2 and 3 respectively
  • Each in-class work is worth 10% of the final grade

Day 1

Quote of the day

“Operations management is a science with which we are all, in some capacity, familiar. We all have scarce resources and have to allocate those resources properly. Think about the process of preparing a meal: you have to gather all the proper ingredients and prepare them for cooking. Certain ingredients go in at certain times. Occasionally, you fall behind or get too far ahead, jeopardizing the entire meal. And, of course, if you find that you do not have enough ingredients, even more problems arise. All of these elements of meal preparation — purchasing ingredients, prepping the ingredients by dicing them up, mixing ingredients together, boiling or baking the dish, serving, and cleaning—can be seen as parts of operations management. In the realm of business, operations management is more complicated than preparing a family meal. There may be hundreds or thousands of participants rather than just you and your brother or wife or grandfather cooking in the kitchen. Each participant has a specific role in the operations process; if any step of the process is disrupted, the whole process can stall or fall apart. Smart operations managers will have contingency plans in the event that stoppages occur.”

‘BUS300: Operations Management’, Saylor Academy. [Online]. Available: https://learn.saylor.org/course/view.php?id=86. [Accessed: 05-Jan-2020].

Learning Objectives

  • Ch. 1
    • Define operations management (p. 2)
    • Explain the distinction between goods and services (p. 9)
    • Explain the difference between production and productivity (p. 11)
    • Identify the critical variables in enhancing productivity (p. 14)

Day 2

Quote of the day

“If you can not measure it, you can not improve it.” —Lord Kelvin

Videos to watch

In-class activity

Source: Heizer, J., Render, B., Griffin, P. (20190102). Operations Management, 3rd Edition. VitalSource Bookshelf version. Retrieved from vbk:9780135233894

Important resource

Learning Objectives

  • Ch. 5
    • LO 2: Describe a product development system (p. 157)
  • Ch. 6

Day 3

Quote of the day

“In the end, all business operations can be reduced to three words: people, product, and profits.” —Lee Iacocca

In-class activity

Learning Objectives

  • Ch. 7
    • LO 1: Describe four production processes (p. 266)
    • LO 2: Compute crossover points for different processes (p. 271)
  • Ch. 9
    • LO 1: Discuss important issues in office layout (p. 352)
    • LO 2: Define the objectives of retail layout (p. 353)
    • LO 3: Discuss modern warehouse management and terms such as ASRS, cross-docking, and random stocking (p. 358)
    • LO 4: Identify when fixed-position layouts are appropriate (p. 358)
    • LO 5: Explain how to achieve good process-oriented facility layout (p. 359)
    • LO 6: Define work cell and the requirements of a work cell (p. 364)
    • LO 7: Define product-oriented layout (p. 367)
    • LO 8: Explain how to balance production flow in a repetitive or product-oriented facility (p. 368)
  • Ch. 10
    • LO 3: Identify major ergonomics and main environment issue (p. 395)

Day 4

Quote of the day

“Would you order a delivery pizza for dinner from a restaurant advertising delivery in 6 hours? How about a restaurant that can bring you a cold, stale pizza in only 5 minutes? To meet the consumer's needs, the pizza shop must be able to give customers the number of pizzas they want when they want it. Preparing pizzas in advance is too wasteful because most consumers are not likely to buy a stale pizza. Meanwhile, if you take too long to deliver the pizza, you will lose customers to a more responsive competitor. The concept of just-in-time focuses on making what you need to meet customer demand only when you need it. For a pizza delivery shop, that probably means a fresh pizza at the customer's door in around 30 minutes. This philosophy can apply to a range of operations, from simply washing a car to manufacturing a complex aircraft.

Similarly, the concept of lean manufacturing refers to eliminating waste in the manufacturing process. The Toyota Product System is the model for modern manufacturers that want to control waste.”

‘BUS300: Operations Management’, Saylor Academy. [Online]. Available: https://learn.saylor.org/course/view.php?id=86. [Accessed: 05-Jan-2020].

Learning Objectives

  • Ch. 7S
    • LO 1: Define capacity (p. 293)
    • LO 2: Determine design capacity, effective capacity, and utilization (p. 295)
    • LO 3: Perform bottlenecks analysis (p. 300)
  • Ch. 15
    • LO 1: Explain the relationship between short-term scheduling, capacity planning, aggregate planning, and a master schedule (p. 581)
  • Ch. 16
    • LO 1: Define Lean operations (p. 619)

Day 5

  • Final exam
  • The project is due
operations_management.txt · Last modified: 2021/06/24 00:31 by Eric Bright